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Nokia N86 review | Introduction

Published on: Friday, October 30th 2009                   Written by: Casper van der Kaaij - Photography by: Mark Peters

Nokia N86 review

T he Finnish cell phone manufacturer Nokia uses special types of operating systems for the different categories of their mobile phones. There is the standard S40 software, used in all current models, such as the Nokia 6300. This operating system is both straightforward and clear. Besides the S40 software, the smartphones run on Symbian; a well-known operating system which also goes by the name of S60. Symbian was developed by a joint venture between Nokia and several other phone manufacturers. At the beginning of 2008, Nokia bought out the other participants and thus became the sole shareholder, which implies Nokia wants to get more out of the Symbian system. Yet, Nokia came up with a new operating system, called Maemo. This system is used in the Nokia N900 as Maemo 5. Maemo is an open-source operating system and will engage in battle with the platforms of competing phone manufacturers. Whether Maemo will actually be the successor to the Symbian system for Nokia, remains to be seen.

Nokia N86 review

 

Nokia N86 smartphone review

Nokia N86 smartphone review

First impression of the Nokia N86 phone

Nokia N86 smartphone review - First impression of the Nokia N86 phone As we are used to from the N-series, the packaging of the Nokia N86 has been looked after with care. There's an extra layer to remove before you get to the actual cell phone. You will find the N86 mobile phone including an extra opening for the battery, so you can start immediately. If you also remove this part of the package, you will then find three other boxes holding the remaining accessories. Included with the Nokia N86 smartphone are the standard accessories: a charger, a headset consisting of two parts, a data cable, a software CD and manuals. The phone looks solid, especially the back, which features a neat and attractive design. The Nokia N86 mobile phone features a two-way slide, to reveal the keypad as well as the multimedia buttons. It has to be said the buttons come across slightly boring, due to their shape and color. This also applies to the keys below the screen; due to their different sizes, colors and positions, it all looks a bit untidy. Furthermore, the Nokia phone is pretty heavy when it comes to its weight.

Nokia N86 review

Nokia N86 review

Nokia N86 8GB mobile phone menu

Since the Nokia N86 uses the Symbian operating system, there is a special menu button placed right below the screen. In addition to the menu button, there are two selection keys, a correction key, navigation keys and the keys to answer or end a call. Standard, an active home screen is displayed, which includes the agenda and several shortcuts. Should this feel as disturbing, you can simply opt to disable this screen. Upon entering the menu, you directly access the main menu showing eleven icons. Also the OVI-store; Nokia’s online content shop, is found here. Everything is pretty clear, although personally I prefer to see the Settings and Camera application in the main menu instead of OVI-store and Maps. Particularly when an 8 megapixel digital camera is concerned.

 

Nokia phone charger

Nokia phone charger

Nokia ear phones

Nokia ear phones

Nokia music controller

Nokia music controller

 
 
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